On the postwar road: “Tourist Rooms to Let — Reasonable Rates.” (Axe murderer not included.)

The Permanent Family Record

Sis (“Big Eek’s spinster sister”) writes: “Subject: A family affair.

“When the Second World War ended and fuel restrictions lifted, war-weary families were encouraged to go on car trips.

“Our family of five climbed into my father’s second-hand coupe for an automotive adventure.

Continue reading “On the postwar road: “Tourist Rooms to Let — Reasonable Rates.” (Axe murderer not included.)”

Why was there DEAD SILENCE when the barbershoppers finished their song?

Fellow travelers
And: Surprise!

A pair of harmonious stories from Waldo Windmill: (1) “In 1968, my barbershop quartet received a joint invitation from the Barbershop Harmony Society and the USO to take a 17-day tour of the Pacific Hospital Circuit. The tour entailed visiting and entertaining wounded veterans of the Vietnam conflict in military hospitals in Japan, Okinawa, Guam, the Philippines and Hawaii.

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Why was the little girl jumping on the couch, just before she broke her leg?

Our livestock, our pets, our gardening pants, our invasive species, ourselves
Or: Life (and death) as we know it (responsorial)

Booklady writes: “I believe I have discovered a kindred spirit in DebK of Rosemount. Her recent saga of her buckthorn incident brought to mind several of my own adventures.

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The buckthorn battle never, unhappily, ends happily (or at all) . . . but it’s not usually this bad!

Our livestock, our pets, our gardening pants, our invasive species, ourselves
Or: Life (and death) as we know it

DebK of Rosemount: “Early in the week, as we laid to rest one of Taxman’s favorite clients, I got to regretting my failure to report on this year’s lambing season. The deceased, a longtime BB enthusiast, had a particular fondness for stories about our ram, Clarence, and his exuberant efforts to see to the continuation of his line.

“Truth to tell, I’ve avoided writing about lambing because so much of the news has been bad.

Continue reading “The buckthorn battle never, unhappily, ends happily (or at all) . . . but it’s not usually this bad!”

How do you find a long-shot winner at the Derby? Savvy research — or blind luck?

Formula 10-10-10

Waldo Windmill writes: “I attended my first and only Kentucky Derby in 2005.

“Good friend Ed, an enthusiastic small-stakes gambler, caught wind of my plans and couldn’t wait to send along a bet with me. His instructions were simple as he handed me a $10 bill: Bet the 10 dollars on the number 10 horse in the 10th race.

Continue reading “How do you find a long-shot winner at the Derby? Savvy research — or blind luck?”